Blog module icon

City of Muscatine Communication Blog

Hello and welcome to our blog. As the Communication Manager for the City of Muscatine, Iowa, I know the importance of communicating with residents and providing them with an understanding of the different functions of the City, why these functions are important to our residents, and what the City is doing for the future of our community.

Many times the story of the various activities, accomplishments, and happenings within the City are not told and we want to make sure that the people behind these activities, accomplishments, and happenings are duly recognized. We also want to explain our vision of the future for the City of Muscatine, something that we take great pride in.

Please check back in periodically to see updates on what's going on here in Muscatine! Please feel free to leave comments on individual postings--the comments will not be displayed here, but they will be emailed to me so that I can collect your thoughts and make adjustments based on the feedback and suggestions. Moderated comments are an option as we progress. Thanks for reading and I hope you find this to be an effective tool!

Nov 06

Long list of accomplishments in an otherwise dreary weather year

Posted on November 6, 2019 at 2:51 PM by Kevin Jenison

MUSCATINE, Iowa – The past year was dominated by near historic weather events that taxed the resources of all City of Muscatine departments. It would be appropriate, then, if the citizens of Muscatine offered forgiveness if the list of accomplishments for each department and division during the past year was shorter than in previous years.

However, forgiveness was not needed. Thanks to the leadership from the top echelons of City administration, the knowledge and experience of professional staff, and the tireless effort and dedication by all staff members, the City was able to meet or exceed many of the 2019 goals adopted by the Muscatine City Council in December 2018.

The list of departmental accomplishments was compiled over the past month as department heads and supervisors meet to review past goals and establish new goals for the upcoming year. The list was sent to the members of the Muscatine City Council on November 4 along with a grant and contribution summary for Fiscal Year 2018-2019.

“It is pretty amazing when you actually read the entire document and read what has occurred in the city this past year along with all the successfully awarded grants,” Jerry Ewers, Muscatine Fire Chief, said.

With one of the snowiest and coldest winters on record followed almost immediately by the start of 99 consecutive days of the Mississippi River being above flood stage, not to mention the abnormally large crop of pot holes that were revealed this spring and the massive post-flood cleanup and restoration efforts, 2019 was one for the record books. And we still have two months to go.

“A lot of credit for these accomplishments has to be given to our city administrator as well as to the department heads and their staff,” Nancy Lueck, Finance Director, said. “Gregg (City Administrator Gregg Mandsager) really fosters and encourages the collaboration between departments and the coordinated efforts needed for many of these accomplishments as well as facilitating the discussion on how to overcome any obstacles and developing financing plans for the projects."

The hard work, long hours, and pride in Muscatine that Mandsager demonstrates is not lost on those that work for the City.

"We all take great pride in the accomplishments in each of our departments," Lueck said. "Some of that comes from the inspiration he gives us.”

One of the highest accomplishments during the past year was increasing the General Fund balance, which continued a 10-year trend in the growth of the fund balance after expenditures. Those reserves provide the City with enough capital to withstand changes in state appropriations or large scale emergencies for at least two months’ worth of expenditures.

The City ended the 2009-10 Fiscal Year with $1.7 million in the General Fund balance or 11.4 percent of expenditures. The fund has increased to $4.8 million or 24.1 percent of expenditures at the end of Fiscal Year 2018-19. The steady growth of the fund balance over the last 10 years resulted from solid fiscal planning and a leadership dedicated to fiscal responsibility while still improving the quality of life for Muscatine residents.

The City’s Finance Department recently received the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for the 35th consecutive year and the GFOA Certificate of Achievement for Comprehensive Financial reporting for the 28th consecutive year. The awards recognize not only the dedication of the Finance Department staff to the overall success of Muscatine but also their work with the City Administrator and directors from each City department in laying out the short term and long term financial strategies for Muscatine.

Among those financial strategies are financial plans for capital projects, plans for the 2020 City Bond Issue, the economic development incentive program (TIF and Tax Abatement), CAT grant oversight, and the financial plan to eliminate the $2.5 million landfill debt that existed at the end of Fiscal Year 2009-10. The department also oversees work with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on recovery from the 2019 flood event, and works with the Information Technology (IT) Department that continues to enhance internet security along with other IT projects.

Mandsager has been instrumental in the negotiations of TIF agreements that have positively affected the economic development of Muscatine. Along with key members from Finance and Community Development, Mandsager led the development of financial plans for capital projects that took advantage of available grants and private contributions to reduce the burden on taxpayers’ money and allow the City to keep the property tax rate unchanged for the past eight years, a key goal for Mandsager. The City has also not had a property tax rate increase in the past 10 years, and that is a credit to the fiscal responsibility and vision of City of Muscatine department heads and the administrator.

One of the departments hardest hit by the weather in 2019 was the Department of Public Works with seemingly endless hours of snow removal followed by seemingly endless hours of monitoring the level of the flooding Mississippi River. Still the department made significant progress in its annual battle with pot holes along with a second year of full depth patching to repair streets and prevent future pot holes, and alley resurfacing projects.

Plans for the Grandview Avenue Corridor Revitalization Project are near completion as is the Park Avenue 4 to 3 Lane Conversion project. The West Side Trail project will start construction on Nov. 11 and the roundabout at Mulberry and 2nd Street is on schedule to begin in January 2020.

The divisions within Public Works also had a solid year and are highlighted in the report.

Other highlights from the 2019 City of Muscatine Accomplishments report:

  • A little over $5 million in grants and contributions were received by the City of Muscatine during Fiscal Year 2018-2019 led by $2.5 million for the Special Revenue Funds and $1.2 million for Capital Projects.
  • The Department of Community Development worked with the developer to facilitate the first new, single-family residential subdivision in more than a decade (Arbor Commons), and supported work to address needs identified in the Housing Demand Study through TIF investment in Oak Park, Arbor Commons, and the Hershey Building.
  • The Housing Department provided 180 families with affordable rental housing, had 28 participants in the Family Self-Sufficiency Program, and awarded 31 families with Certificates of Completion of Homebuyer Education Course.
  • The Water Resource and Recovery Facility began construction of the High Strength Waste Receiving Project and began three studies, one a wetlands study for two areas at the Pollinator Park, one for nutrient reduction from urban runoff, and one on the flooding issues in Iowa Field.
  • The Muscatine Fire Department continued to see an increase in run volume while also continuing annual public education classes, and increasing department training.
  • Several new programs were established by the Muscatine Police Department while continuing to promote community-policing efforts such as park and walk, bike patrol, and being visible to the public.
  • The Department of Parks and Recreation, another one of the departments hardest hit by this spring’s Mississippi River flooding event, still had a long list of achievements highlighted by another successful College Search Kickoff soccer event and the development of the Houser Street Athletic and Parking addition.
  • The Muscatine Art Center is creating a more aggressive exhibition schedule, secured several grants to provide additional funding, and served 15,654 individuals, their highest number in the last five years.
  • The Musser Public Library opened in a new home and has seen a large increase in the number of individuals visiting the facility.

Sep 14

Muscatine Firefighters, public pause to remember Fallen Firefighter Mike Kruse

Posted on September 14, 2019 at 8:52 AM by Kevin Jenison


MUSCATINE, Iowa
– Michael Kruse was remembered with the laying of a wreath at the Firefighters Memorial Saturday (Sept. 14) during a special service commemorating the 17th anniversary of his death.

Kruse was 53-years-old and a 27-year veteran of the Muscatine Fire Department when he lost his life while fighting a house fire on the night of September 14, 2002. He was the first and only Muscatine firefighter to die in the line of duty, the only Iowa fire fighter to lose their life while on duty in 2002 and the 131st in the state of Iowa since records began in 1890. A total of 147 fire fighters have fallen in the line of duty since 1890.

Muscatine Fire Chief Jerry Ewers was just named a fire lieutenant when he first met Kruse as part of his team at Station 2.

“I remember that night very well,” Ewers said.

Muscatine Fire Department’s Green Shift responded to a structure fire at 10:30 p.m. on that Saturday night (Sept. 14, 2002) finding a wooden three-story multi-family home at the intersection of Orange and East 6th streets engulfed in flames. Kruse was one of two firefighters who were working on the structure's roof when Kruse fell through and into the structure below.

When Ewers arrived at the scene he issued an all-call to bring in other shifts and relieve Green Shift in containing the fire.

“The tragedy suffered by Green Shift was felt by all those who came to the scene,” Ewers said. “But it was best to relieve that shift and allow them to grieve. We still had a job to do but it was a very emotional night.”

Kruse’s dedication to job safety and protecting Muscatine residents is a lesson that can be taught to firefighters of today and those of the future. His sacrifice and loss of life while on active duty, the emotional toll it took on his family, co-workers, and Muscatine residents, and the hope that Muscatine will never experience a tragedy such as this ever again are all part of the message presented during each memorial service.

“Mike was one of the most safety conscious firefighter’s on the department,” Ewers said during a speech in 2012 commemorating the 10th anniversary of Kruse’s death. “Mike always looked out for other firefighters to make sure they were doing the job safely and that they had their full protective equipment on at all times.”

Ewers first met Kruse in the 1990’s as a newly appointed Fire Lieutenant assigned to Station 2. Kruse and firefighter June Anne Gaeta were his crew.

Ewers admits that as a very young, very green fire lieutenant he was book smart but lacked the fire ground command and exposure to structure fires.

“Mike was a true teacher and mentor to me,” Ewers said. “His experience in fighting real fires, his expertise with the equipment, and his knowledge of the city helped this young lieutenant grow.”

Kruse joined the department in 1975 and was one of the first members to obtain his fire science degree at MCC.

“He was a true firefighter dedicated to protecting property and saving lives,” Ewers said. “He was very detail oriented, liked everything clean and in its place, and took his job very seriously.”

Ewers spoke of the difference between commemoration and celebration during his 2012 speech. Commemorating an event, he said, is done to honor the memory of that event. Celebration is a time or rejoicing, a time to feel good about something that has happened.

“Commemorations often remind us of what we have lost,” Ewers said. “Commemorations are important, not because of the words spoken, but because of honor, courage, and sacrifice that were displayed during the time of the event itself.

“We all know in our hearts that firefighting is a dangerous profession,” Ewers said. “Mike knew this when he was hired in 1975. Not every firefighter who responds to the sound of an alarm is guaranteed a safe return to quarters. Some will be mentally scarred for life with what we see and encounter at emergency scenes, some will be seriously injured, and some will pay the ultimate price.

“So it was with Mike Kruse on September 14, 2002 while battling a house fire at 6th and Orange just a few blocks from here,” Ewers said. “We have gathered here to commemorate that tragic event that took one of our own and left behind a painful gap in our ranks. We will continue to do this as long as the Muscatine Fire Department is in existence.”

Muscatine’s Firefighters Memorial is located at the intersection of Cedar and 5th Streets.

Kruse is among the fallen firefighters to be honored with inclusion on the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial. In his memorial, his children wrote:

“Mike was a ‘True American Hero.’ He never wanted to be recognized for all the wonderful things he did. Mike always stood up for what he believed in. He was always honest‚ even though the other person did not want to hear what he had to say. Mike always followed the rules‚ unless someone gave him a direct order to do otherwise.

Mike always put others before himself. He always talked about his family which he was so proud of. Mike stood by them through thick and thin. He gave his children unconditional love. He taught them to respect other people for who they are. Mike explained to them to love life because life is short. He became their best friend. He loved them for who they are. He was so excited about his little grandson‚ who bore his name. He took time out of his busy life to spend lots of loving moments with him.

Mike always went the extra mile at home and at work. He kept track of every run he had ever been on. He stopped by some of the houses while he was out for his morning jog and checked on patients to make sure they were doing all right. He never passed up the opportunity to play in the yearly basketball game with the Special Olympics. Mike always enjoyed carrying the boot and receiving donations for MDA.

Mike was a veteran at the fire department for twenty-seven years. He was still able to keep up with some of the younger guys. He was able to give the younger firemen the knowledge he had learned over the years. He was very respected for that.

Mike was taken from us at a moment in time when his family and friends were so proud of who he was. He will always remain alive in our hearts as a ‘True American Hero.’”


Sep 03

Disinformation is prevalent on development project for Carver Corner in Muscatine

Posted on September 3, 2019 at 9:09 PM by Kevin Jenison

A recent post on social media concerning the proposed redevelopment of the area known as “Carver Corner” has spurred a tremendous amount of discussion. However, the post has more disinformation than actual facts.

Continue Reading...